FAQ: What Can We Eat If We Get A Direct Train?

 

The good news is that even if you travel the Trans-Siberian direct that you’ll still get to taste the food of whichever country you’re passing through. The train remains the same throughout your journey but the dining car is replaced at every border with one from that country. The above photo shows a Chinese Trans-Mongolian train going from Moscow-Beijing but it has a Mongolian dining cart as the train has passed from Russia into Mongolia.

The direct train still stops up to ten times a day and one of these will be a longer stay at the station – around 30 minutes –where you can venture a little further than the platform to stock up at a kiosk, just don’t forget your passport. You’ll find vendors at the shorter stops, too. These are often local grandmas with delicious homecooked treats or folks selling semi-recognizable snacks. Vendors are more abundant in the warmer months, especially in Siberia.

Travelling direct means you really to get the feel the rhythym of a long train journey but you definitely won’t miss out on the tastes of the countries you pass through.

Photos by Oleg Rezabek (September, 2007)

Listvyanka guesthouse new block

guesthouse view

Nearly all of our guests will stop in Irkutsk as part of their Trans-Siberian Railway tour and will stay for a few nights on the shores of magical Lake Baikal.  The majority of these customers will visit Listvyanka, which is a small village on the shore of Lake Baikal and the easiest part of the lake to visit from Irkutsk, taking just over one hour’s drive along the main road.

Visiting Eagle (Oryol)

eagle

We have many strange requests for adding in destinations along the Trans Siberian Railway.  Often a customer will look at a map and decide that somewhere like Tomsk for instance, is a place roughly intersecting the railway and worthy of a stop.  Even though Tomsk isn’t exactly on the map, we can arrange train tickets.  Another place was Oryol.

Oryol or Orel (Орёл) which translates as eagle is a city on the Oka River around 220 miles southwest of Moscow.